Earlier this year, the FDA concluded a report about the dangers of dog bone treats. Coby Richter, DVM, DACVS, blogs about an example of why dog bones can cause fatal complications.

Every time I walk by the bulk bins in certain grocery stores, I recall a beautiful middle aged Boxer dog that died because her family decided to give her a new treat. She’s not the only death from a...

Learn from DoveLewis Technician Kara Prater, CVT, about the important factors to consider when housing reptilian patients in an emergency hospital.

Reptilian patients like lizards, geckos, and snakes, need special treatment while in the hospital. Learn from Technician Kara Prater, CVT, about the options for heat support and safety considerations.

We all have those cases that stick with us long after our shifts end. Stress and trauma are inherent in the work we do, but we can begin to combat this by creating a nurturing environment to process both medically and emotionally challenging cases. Some of the hardest cases provide the most immense learning opportunities. Burnout, compassion fatigue, imposter syndrome and second-victim...

Whether you’re a dog or a human, chances are that your blood donation experience will have some clear similarities—but there are some big differences, too.

Our team works hard to follow the available human blood bank model with adjustments that let us build relationships with our incredible donors and their families. Pet owners and veterinary professionals alike are curious about what...

Learn from DoveLewis Surgeon Coby Richter, DVM, DACVS, about how to safely apply eye lubrication prior to surgery.

Learn from DoveLewis Technicians Kara Prater, CVT, and Sarah Harris, CVT, VTS (ECC) about how to be effective patient advocates for exotic species.

Patients come in all shapes and sizes, and all deserve our full attention. Learn from Technicians Kara Prater, CVT, and Sarah Harris, CVT, VTS(ECC), about a ferret that received blood transfusions at DoveLewis.

Hypothermia occurs when there is a decrease in core temperature, causing the patients temperature to fall below the normal range. The normal range varies, but in general, it should be about 100°F to 102.5°F for dogs and cats, and can be determined by a temperature reading from an oral or rectal thermometer. Hypothermia can also affect specific areas, such as extremities, and be described as...

In the ER, surgeries can present with little to no notice. Learn from DoveLewis Surgery Assistant Trynity Alvarez about how to set-up a surgery suite (in less than 4 minutes!)

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