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Tiny Talk - ETCO2 in Anesthesia

Views: 12446 - Comments: 7

In this Tiny Talk, Megan Brashear, CVT, VTS (ECC), discusses end tidal CO2 and why it is important to monitor in anesthetized patients. Understanding what that value means to the patient and tips for keeping it within the normal range are discussed. 

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Megan Brashear's picture
Megan Brashear

CVT VTS(ECC)

Enrolled: 07/2011

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dlManager's picture

Just looking at the comment functionality! It's awesome

Bertsie Cantu's picture

What about the inhaled CO2 levels? Most of the times I've seen a value of 0 but occasionally i'll get values ranging from 2-9.

Jessica Waters-Miller's picture

Hi Bertsie,

Thank you for the question! You are correct that is a broad range. This elevated number or the inhaled ETCO2 can be due to hyperventilation where they are not taking proper breaths (making small short ones) so the air exchange is not complete. Another common reason can be because of an anesthetic machine malfunction; for example, the exhaust valve is stuck causing a backup of ETCO2 or it could be due to the baralyme needing to be replaced. It is also important to adjust the oxygen flow rate to the patient's needs. If it continues to trend upward I would disconnect the patient and use a different machine.
There can be many factors to an increase in inhaled ETCO2 but knowing more about the case would be important and what equipment you use. I hope this makes sense and helps a little. If you have more specific questions please leave another comment.

Krista Frye's picture

Do you guys ever have an issue with a machine malfunction? I have had several instances where my EtCO2 is either really high or really low and the mapping isn't consistent with the breaths the patient is taking. I have tried several different anesthesia related changes and even when i breathe for the patient it wont pick it up. I'm not sure if there's some sort of maintenance I'm missing or anyone else experiences this?

Rachel Medo's picture

Hi Krista,

Can you let me know what brand of machine or type of equipment you are using? I've passed your question along to a few of our staff at DoveLewis.

Krista Frye's picture

Thanks for getting back to me! its the surgivet advisor 3

Rachel Medo's picture

Hi Krista,

I checked in with our Medical Equipment Specialist about your question and have put her response below.

"We use the SurgiVet Advisor 4 here at DoveLewis. It sounds like your machine needs to be calibrated to hopefully address the problems your having. I believe the SurgiVet (Smiths Medical product) is supposed to be serviced once yearly by the manufacturer.

There is also a calibration kit specifically for the ETCO2 that can be purchased through Smiths Medical. I believe the recommendation is to have it calibrated every 3 months or so. We employ Patterson Veterinary to do monthly equipment maintenance at our hospital, and their technician checks our SurgiVet monitors every month, calibrating them if necessary.

If you would like to purchase the calibration kit from Smiths Medical or get advice, I highly recommend speaking directly with one of their technicians (Tel: 888-745-6562, then pick option 2). Their techs are usually very helpful over the phone."

Hopefully that at least gives you a starting place! Please let me know if I can answer any additional questions.